Modesto Bee And News-Herald, The | Modesto, California | Wednesday, January 29, 1936

MERCED PIONEER WOMAN IS CALLED

DAUGHTER AND GRANDDAUGHTER OF SOLDIERS CAME TO STATE IN COVERED WAGON

MERCED, Jan 28.

Mrs. Amanda Lewis Russell, 83, who was brought across the plains from Texas to California by her parents in 1853, died early today at her home near the junction of the Golden State and Le Grand Highways, seven miles south of Merced.

Mrs. Russell was a daughter of Jacob and Ann Elizabeth Lewis. Her father was a veteran of the Mexican War and her grandfather, John Lewis, a captain who fought under General Andrew Jackson in the War of 1812.

One of seven children in the family, she was born in Sherman, Texas. Her father located at White Rock, Mariposa county, establishing a flour mill there. He later conducted a general store. He was the first postmaster in the new community, and the postoffice was named Lewis after him.

MARRIED ON WHITE ROCK

As a girl, Amanda Lewis attended the Cathey Valley School in Mariposa County. On June 27, 1867, she and Edmund Russell were married in a ceremony performed on top of White Rock. Russell died in 1907.

The couple had thirteen sons and daughters, of whom five are living. They are: Temple Russell of Santa Cruz, Rev. O. L. Russell of Dos Palos, Grayson Russell of Merced, Mrs. William Young of Berkeley and Mrs. Claude Ritchey of Oakland.

EIGHT GRANDCHILDREN

Mrs. Russell also leaves eight grandchildren, Mrs. Ruth Andreasen of San Francisco, Mrs. Helen Mott of Dos Palos, Mrs. Vera Keith of Santa Cruz, Mrs. Marlitt Skark of San Jose, Mrs. L. G. Wilson of Chowchilla, Ivan and Dallas Ritchey of Oakland, and Miss Amy Jane Young of Berkeley, and eight great grandchildren.

Mrs. Lou Pratt of College City is a sister.

Mrs. Russell was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Merced.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock in the Welch & Griffin Funeral Home, with Rev. David McMartin officiating. Burial will be in the Plainsburg Cemetery.

contributed by Carol Lackey